Coaching practice

The Gauntlet Drill

A long-standing line of delivery (LOD) drill used in curling is one where the athlete delivers a stone by sliding between a series of markers (cones, cups, or stones) to practice line of delivery. We term this drill the “gauntlet drill”. When coupled with a point laser and video recording, the gauntlet drill is an excellent way to practice an athlete’s line of delivery and its use permits root-cause analysis of line of delivery faults that can materialize as competitive

Brushing footwork in the open stance

This article is joint work, and part of a continuing research project, with Dr. John Newhook, Professor of Engineering at Dalhousie University. We are grateful to Alison Poluck and Monica Graham for their demonstrations of closed technique. Most importantly, we would like to thank Fraser Reid, former Canadian university champion and now a coach at Wilfrid Laurier University – and one of the best brushers in the game – for his demonstrations of brushing in the open stance. Introduction

Training tips for dryland brushing footwork practice

Several Ontario teams have acquired or built dryland footwork trainers to better develop their closed brushing footwork technique during the summer months, so that they are trained and ready-to-go when ice becomes available in the fall. Note: the Junior curling season will be here before you know it; the first week of the Trillium Curling Camp at K-W Granite is only six weeks away! What follows are some training tips and coaching hints for those teams using a footwork trainer

Upcoming OCC Webinars for Coaches and Curlers!

The Ontario Curling Council (OCC) and its members, the Ontario Curling Association and the Northern Ontario Curling Association have collaborated and will jointly host the OCC webinar series for coach and athlete development. Certified Coaches  and athletes alike will be able to learn from some of the games most qualified subject matter experts on a variety of topics.  The OCC is aiming to “fill” the season with meaningful learning opportunities for coaches and curlers to access.  Certified coaches will earn valuable professional

Dalhousie students develop new smartbroom prototype

This past week, on September 15 2016, Dalhousie University engineering students Devon Hartlen and Katherine Adye presented their team’s design for a sophisticated curling “smart broom” to the 2016 Engineers Nova Scotia Annual General Meeting in Halifax, by invitation after the students’ presentation at the CEEA annual student design competition. The project team included students Alex Landry and Emile Feniyanos, and was supervised by Dalhousie Civil Engineering professor John Newhook. The students’ design improves on existing

Practice Doesn’t Make Perfect

If there is any question I get asked more than any other it’s, “How does a curler practice”? The traditions of our game, which are held in such high esteem, and rightly so, let us down somewhat here. We do not have a tradition of practicing in our game. Indeed, for decades, one’s skill was honed by playing, not practicing. The farmers who were the heart and soul of curling in western Canada played upward of 200 games per season