open position

Dryland Training for Open Brushing Footwork

This article is joint work with Dr. John Newhook, Dean of Engineering, Dalhousie University. In a previous article, entitled “Dryland Training for Closed Brushing Footwork”, we described a simple, wheeled apparatus that an athlete could use to practice closed brushing footwork in the off-season. The closed footwork trainer assists an athlete in (1) keeping their hips closed to the trajectory of the stone while brushing, (2) holding their body upright with a considerable proportion of their body weight

Brushing footwork in the open stance

This article is joint work, and part of a continuing research project, with Dr. John Newhook, Professor of Engineering at Dalhousie University. We are grateful to Alison Poluck and Monica Graham for their demonstrations of closed technique. Most importantly, we would like to thank Fraser Reid, former Canadian university champion and now a coach at Wilfrid Laurier University – and one of the best brushers in the game – for his demonstrations of brushing in the open stance. Introduction

Brushing footwork: a case study

Brushing is arguably the most under-rated and under-coached aspect of the game of curling. In 2010, Paul Webster of the Canadian Curling Association posted an article detailing the optimal body position for the most effective sweeping. It is this position that you’ll often see the world’s top curlers use; for example, here is a photograph of Team Martin executing a shot against Randy Ferbey’s rink at the 2009 Canada Cup: John Morris delivers

The Technique of Brushing

Curling is a team sport; every shot is a team shot. Each shot requires co-operation by all four players: the skip to call the line, the thrower to throw the stone at the broom, and the sweepers to place the stone at exactly the right point on the sheet. But brushing, while being critical to making many shots, is arguably the most under-coached technique in curling. At the Team Glenn Howard fantasy camp in October 2010, attendees were