Technique

Brushing footwork in the open stance

This article is joint work, and part of a continuing research project, with Dr. John Newhook, Professor of Engineering at Dalhousie University. We are grateful to Alison Poluck and Monica Graham for their demonstrations of closed technique. Most importantly, we would like to thank Fraser Reid, former Canadian university champion and now a coach at Wilfrid Laurier University – and one of the best brushers in the game – for his demonstrations of brushing in the open stance. Introduction

Training tips for dryland brushing footwork practice

Several Ontario teams have acquired or built dryland footwork trainers to better develop their closed brushing footwork technique during the summer months, so that they are trained and ready-to-go when ice becomes available in the fall. Note: the Junior curling season will be here before you know it; the first week of the Trillium Curling Camp at K-W Granite is only six weeks away! What follows are some training tips and coaching hints for those teams using a footwork trainer

Building a dryland footwork trainer

Since publishing the first article about the footwork trainer in June, a number of people have asked for more detailed specifications and additional photographs so that they can construct their own. The trainer itself is simple to construct. The parts list is as follows: two 30-inch wood pieces of 2×6 glued and screwed together using 3-inch brass wood screws; one 30-inch piece of 2×4 attached to the top, again using 3-inch brass screws; two 18-inch 2×4 pieces for the trainer’s wheelbase.

On-ice training for brushing footwork

This past June I wrote an article that described the use of a footwork trainer for brushing in the closed position. The trainer permits competitive athletes to train off-ice, on their own time, and I have been extremely pleased with the results with Team McKenzie over the past three months. Alison Poluck and Jessica Filipcic, who appear in that video, have done extremely well in learning closed position brushing footwork and that has instantly translated into better on-ice performance

Bio-mechanics, strength and conditioning in Wheelchair Curling: Part 1

Wheelchair curling made its Paralympic debut at the 2006 Winter Paralympic Games. As of February 2015, there were athletes in 21 countries around the world actively competing in wheelchair curling. Because of the sport’s infancy there has been little bio-mechanical study done to support the development of wheelchair curling athletes. However, Curling Canada is taking steps in this direction through the studies of Brock Laschowski, a Master’s student of Engineering and a researcher at the University of Waterloo. In July

Thoughts on brushing for the 2016-2017 season

On June 27, 2016 the World Curling Federation published its preliminary findings from the “Sweeping Summit” that was held at Kemptville, Ontario in mid-June. The summit included representatives from various brush manufacturers, provincial and national sport organizations including the WCF, and a variety of elite players from a number of countries including Canada. A preliminary analysis of the data gathered at the Summit prompted the WCF to publish a set of recommendations it plans to ratify at the WCF’s